Michael Graves is an American architect and designer known for his contemporary building designs that can be found in many cities around the United States. Graves and his design firm have earned critical acclaim for many of their building designs, even though the unconventional design of his windows causes obstructed viewing by some patrons.

Michael Graves is a very influential figure in the venuepunk aesthetic, as you can plainly see. Many of his buildings’ characteristics such as his sharp geometric patterns, vibrant colour choices and perfectly square windows are very evocative of the aesthetic as a whole.

In descending order from left to right: Michael Graves in 1962, Team Disney Burbank, The Dolphin Resort and Hotel in Walt Disney World, Hyatt San Diego, and the Portland Building.

While I have been flooding this blog with Memphis, (not really) I will take the opportunity of this extremely hot vanity mirror to make note of designer Michael Graves. I need to dedicate a post to him, because a huge majority of the buildings on here have been designed by him. 

While I have been flooding this blog with Memphis, (not really) I will take the opportunity of this extremely hot vanity mirror to make note of designer Michael Graves. I need to dedicate a post to him, because a huge majority of the buildings on here have been designed by him. 

Holy shit. I’m crying so hard. 
Recognition guys. Recognition. 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/memphis-milano/with/10580072473

Holy shit. I’m crying so hard. 

Recognition guys. Recognition. 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/memphis-milano/with/10580072473

mexibambiii-deactivated20141014 said: I had no idea that this aesthetic had a name! I love the nostalgia..

I just made this name up. Even though it’s kinda meaningless, to me it evokes these sorts of buildings and designs somehow. I dunno. 

And yes, I run on nostalgia. :3

klaus-laserdisc said: I usually refer to this style as Memphis Group or Memphis. It was an interior design group in the early 80s. The style influenced graphic design and architecture well into the 90s. Check it out bro, good stuff!

OH.

MY.

GOD.

YES. I literally had no idea of this design firm’s existence. Yes! A lot of their stuff is extremely venuepunk and it’s very, very nice to see some possible origins of this aesthetic. 

Thank you, Max Headroom Mask. Thank you. 

The Regions-Harbert Plaza located in downtown Birmingham, AL. I’ve always admired this building. Birmingham is a city of mostly generic skyscrapers, so this one always sticks out. 
I also discovered that there are not many good images of this skyscraper available online. 

The Regions-Harbert Plaza located in downtown Birmingham, AL. I’ve always admired this building. Birmingham is a city of mostly generic skyscrapers, so this one always sticks out. 

I also discovered that there are not many good images of this skyscraper available online. 

So yeah, I’m not dead.

Here’s three images of the Wonders of Life pavilion that used to reside in Epcot at Walt Disney World. The pavilion was all about health and human body related subjects, as you can assume from the title. As you may also assume from the title, there was a short film about reproduction starring Martin Short called the Making Of Me that was played here. Strange.

Anyway, the pavilion opened in 1989, and you can tell because the interior design and the architectural choices are very venuepunk-ish. The first picture is from the days when it was still open, and the last two are most likely from around 2005 or something; the pavilion closed in 2007 and has been sitting around since then, hosting events related to the seasonal shindigs that Epcot has.

Actually, no, disregard that early post. This is venuepunk fashion. Totally.

Actually, no, disregard that early post. This is venuepunk fashion. Totally.